Socialist Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) made a series of bizarre statements over the weekend while campaigning in Iowa for fellow socialist and Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), saying that when a politician has let her down, “it feels like I never want to love again.”

Ocasio-Cortez made the remarks on Saturday during a “Climate Crisis” summit in Iowa where she spoke to an audience that appeared to consist largely of far-left climate activists.

After Ocasio-Cortez and Sanders both gave their speeches, the two had a question and answer session where Ocasio-Cortez tried to relate to the audience by talking about how she emotionally processes a politician letting her down.

“And so, when you elect a politician, and then they let you down, it feels like rejection,” Ocasio-Cortez said. “It feels like heart break. It feels like betrayal. It feels like I never want to love again. That’s what that feels like.”

“And so, I understand how that feels because I felt that way,” Ocasio-Cortez continued. “But you know what happens when you say, ‘I never want to love again’? Your heart gets black and you turn angry and get very anxious.”

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During the event, Ocasio-Cortez also appeared to suggest that President Donald Trump was a virus or a disease that people needed to vaccinate themselves against.

“Trump is a symptom, he is a symptom of much deeper problems,” Ocasio-Cortez said.

“Here’s the thing, is that we can beat him but we have to vaccinate ourselves against something like this ever happening again,” Ocasio-Cortez said in reference to Trump’s 2016 election victory, adding, “and the way we inoculate ourselves from late-stage hyper capitalistic concentration of wealth among the very, very few is with a labor movement.”

Ocasio-Cortez suggested that the only way that Americans could “get through this moment” was to “guarantee” health care to everyone.

“The way we inoculate ourselves from continuing to burn up our planet at unsustainable level triggering feedback loops that we have not even begun to comprehend is by honoring indigenous wisdom and allowing it to guide our climate policy,” Ocasio-Cortez continued. “The way that we preserve our systems is by transitioning to principles of universality, that means I want you clothed, I want you educated, I want you paid a living wage – no ifs, ands, or buts. And what that also means [and] what Naomi talked about as well is directly, consciously, combating white supremacy in the United States of America.”

“When people try to accuse us of going too far left – we’re not pushing the party left,” she said, according to The New York Times. “We are bringing the party home.”

“Yet what remains unclear, even after her positive reception this weekend, is whether Ms. Ocasio-Cortez and the political ideology that she and Mr. Sanders embrace resonates beyond Iowa’s more liberal pockets,” The Times added. “Mr. Sanders is still running third in most polls, faces formidable competition from Ms. Warren for progressive voters and is likely to endure nagging doubts about his fitness right up until the first Iowans caucus on Feb. 3.”