Republican Rep. Devin Nunes announced in an interview with Breitbart News that fired FBI Director James Comey still may face prosecution even though the Inspector General decided against prosecuting him.

Nunes explained that although Comey escaped prosecution from the Inspector General, he still can be prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney in Connecticut for criminal conspiracy.

Last week, the Inspector General’s office released the long awaited report relating to Comey’s questionable behavior as the director of the FBI.

The report goes into great detail about all the rules that Comey broke in order to turn the American people on President Donald Trump. “Comey’s actions with respect to the Memos violated Department and FBI policies concerning the retention, handling, and dissemination of FBI records and information, and violated the requirements of Comey’s FBI Employment Agreement,” says the report.

The report goes on to state that Comey “violated Department and FBI policies, and the terms of his FBI Employment Agreement, by retaining copies of Memos 2, 4, 6, and 7 after he was removed as Director, regardless of each Memo’s classification level.”

He also failed to “tell anyone from the FBI that he had retained copies of the Memos in his personal safe at home,” even though his chief of staff, associate deputy director, and three other officials went to his home “to inventory and remove all FBI property.”

Comey’s actions eventually triggered a special counsel to investigate President Trump which ended up wasting millions of dollars considering Robert Mueller couldn’t find any collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Considering all these facts, it’s odd that the Inspector General decided not to prosecute Comey for clearly violating FBI policy. Nunes explains however that the U.S Attorney in Connecticut can prosecute Comey considering he is in charge of investigating how the Russian collusion investigation even started in the first place.

“I always remind people that the Inspector General does not have a lot of power because they cannot—they don’t have subpoena power,” Nunes announced. “They can only interview people who work for the actual agency, unless people will voluntarily be interviewed, which is not likely. So, I think the Inspector General did us a favor here because the House Intelligence Committee Republicans—we sent over referrals to the Department of Justice based on conspiracy. So now there is no question, one thing the Inspector General made clear by all the interviews and evidence that he gathered is that Comey is definitely part of the conspiracy.”

Nunes continued: “You know, when Comey came before the Congress last year when Republicans controlled it, he refused to answer,” Nunes said. “For a guy that pontificates on Twitter and that wrote a book and goes on the news quite often, quite frequently, when it got behind closed doors and he had to tell the truth, his number one answer was, ‘Oh, I just don’t remember that’ or ‘I don’t recall.’”

Nunes then added that Comey is “eligible for a larger conspiracy charge” and stated that “we need real charges brought.”

“So this is a guy who is definitely not telling the truth, and the good thing about the IG report is he’s now made himself, the IG has now made him eligible for a larger conspiracy charge—a criminal conspiracy charge—which is what we really hope the attorney general [U.S. attorney] out of Connecticut is able to do,” said Nunes. “That’s the big thing that we need. We need real charges brought. And I think a lot of people are frustrated because they feel like Comey leaked classified information. But the question is would a panel of jurors in Washington, D.C., [convict]? There would be so much ambiguity because he claims—I forget the exact numbers, but like 1, 4, and 7 contained classified information but those weren’t the memos that he gave to his professor friend that went to the media. It would be almost impossible to prove and he would probably skate. And probably the worst thing to happen would be for him to skate. So I think that in the end, the Attorney General made the right decision as long as they continue to press on the larger issue which is: How did this whole investigation begin in the first place with zero evidence, zero evidence that Trump had any involvement with Russia?”

Nunes later said that he wasn’t sure what the U.S. Attorney would do in relation to the potential prosecution of Comey, but did say that “the evidence is there.”

“I’ve been very careful,” Nunes said. “I shouldn’t be this way, but I like to give people the benefit of the doubt and I like to not name names until there’s been a fair process and we’ve given the U.S. Attorney time to do his work. However, with that said, the one thing that is clear is if the U.S. Attorney decides to take our complaint—I’m not saying he’s going to do exactly what we’ve asked him to do but he’s clearly looking at all this. If he looks at conspiracy, on the FISA courts and the manipulation of intelligence for political purposes, it is now impossible—there is so much evidence that puts Comey right in the middle of this—so that’s my point. If they’re going to go down that road, Comey has got to be involved in it. The evidence is there.”