U.S. military personnel, particularly pilots from the Air Force and the Navy, have encountered numerous unidentified flying objects, with at least 25 reports filed since 2014.

The War Zone, a website dedicated to national defense and military reporting, used the Freedom of Information Act to obtain information relating to the reports, following last year’s bombshell revelation that Navy Fighter pilots have had several encounters with UFOs in recent years, some of which were caught on film.

Some of the reports gathered by TWZ were mundane, such as military units being unable to establish contact with an unidentified aircraft. Others were troubling, including multiple near-collisions with the unidentified aircraft.

For example, On July 2, 2014, an “unidentified helicopter” flew close beneath two aircraft, who could not establish contact with it:

The HC-130P’s crew had first spotted to object when they saw a bright light near the aircraft. The HH-60G crew also saw it and initially thought it might be headlights on a vehicle on the road below. However, the light grew brighter to the point of blinding the Pave Hawk’s pilots, who were operating using night-vision goggles at the time. This resulted in an extremely dangerous situation in which the helicopter’s crew was no longer aware of their distance from the HC-130P, or that they were moving backward away from it, until the HH-60G’s aerial refueling probe inadvertently disconnected from the drogue basket trailing behind the Combat King.

In another incident, on May 15, 2015, an aircraft’s Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) alerted the crew to a potential collision. The did as the TCAS suggested and performed a 4,000 feet-per-minute climb. The TCAS no longer sensed danger. The crew never saw another aircraft or received any calls from another aircraft about a potential collision, TWZ reported.

Several other reports included near-collisions with unmanned drones.

“Now, regardless of how complete the reporting of incidents involving unidentified aerial objects in AFSAS is, the 25 reports that we do have still show some interesting trends. The most immediate of these is the steady rise of lower-end drone activity in general, something that has been an increasing issue for commercial air operations, as well. Regulators around the world, including the Federal Aviation Administration, have struggled to develop rules and guidelines that are practical and enforceable,” TWZ reported.

As The Daily Wire’s Emily Zanotti previously reported at the end of April, the Pentagon officially released three videos featuring “unidentified aerial phenomena,” which were first leaked in 2007 and again in 2017.

“DOD [Department of Defense] is releasing the videos in order to clear up any misconceptions by the public on whether or not the footage that has been circulating was real, or whether or not there is more to the videos. The aerial phenomena observed in the videos remain characterized as ‘unidentified,’” the Pentagon said in a statement at the time.